The Beginning: Behind the Desk

Ever since I was small, I’ve been enamored with voiceover. I loved cartoons and video games as a child. Like everyone else I knew growing up, I especially loved (and imitated) the Simpsons, a treasure trove of character, humor, scripting, and outright quality. However, I hadn’t dreamed I could actually make a living doing voiceover, which seemed to be the calling of a scant few monoliths in LA. Instead, I got a safer, more responsible (?) degree in English - writing, specifically - and worked many different jobs (none involving writing, incidentally). The decision to ignore my dream job shaped my 20’s - a life of boring office monotony.

Life before voiceover involved many neckties.

Life before voiceover involved many neckties.

The Recent Past: The Acting Bug Strikes

One day in 2013, I did something scary. I auditioned for a play. The honor was mine to portray real-life Pinkerton detective Frank Geyer in the Baltimore Rock Opera Society production of Murdercastle. I soon realized that “voice actor” was what I wanted to be when I grew up, and this was as close to growing up as I was going to get. Since then, I’ve managed to appear in TV shows, film, theatre, commercials, and podcasts. Soon after all that, I focused down solely to voiceover, for which I’ve found to have my singularly strongest affinity and talent.

Photo by Heather Keating

Photo by Heather Keating

The Present: Voiceover is My Business

Now in my 30’s, work is not a job. It’s an identity, a choice I have to make every day. I often tell people looking for advice on how to get into voice over that it’s a lifestyle. And learning the business is just as intricate and detailed and massive a task as learning to perform voiceover itself. Luckily, I like a challenge and was dumb enough to quit all my other jobs, so I was able to learn (and continue to learn) both sides of the trade. Not everyone is built to take risks like that. It takes talent, skill, luck, timing, money, and a pretty huge skill set that has nothing to do with acting. It’s a marathon, and eventually you learn there aren’t any shortcuts. I take strides every day in order to improve my abilities, my business acumen, and the value I provide to my clients. Today, I can promise broadcast-level audio with a competitive turnaround and a rate that’s fair and doesn’t shortchange either of us. I can talk shop on technique, gear, audio engineering, or what’s going on the VO world.

Voice over is my business. An identity that I choose, every day.

Pro-tip: being super strong is important in voiceover.

Pro-tip: being super strong is important in voiceover.

 

 

The Future: Behind the Mic

I look forward to the decades of work ahead of me. New challenges, new genres, new mountains to climb. I’m behind the mic from now on. Shall we make something good together?